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570 Research products, page 1 of 57

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    George Koumoundouros;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | PerformFISH (727610)

    This scoring sheet was developed to collect data on the larval rearing methodology which is followed by commercial finfish hatcheries. It was used by Kourkouta et al. [Sci Rep. 2022 Oct 25;12(1):17896. doi: 10.1038/s41598-022-23008-z] to examine the link between the variability in the rearing conditions, and the variability in skeletal abnormalities incidence.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Katharina Biely;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SUFISA (635577), EC | SUFISA (635577)

    The documents in these folders represent part of the qualitative data collection documentation. Research has been performed in Flanders (Belgium) in 2016 and 2017. Involved stakehodlers were flemish sugar beet farmers, processors as well as other value chain members. Though, the main stakeholders involved were farmers. The raw data cannot be published. Anonymized interview transcripts and focus group transcripts exist. However, as indicated in the informed consent, farmers did not agree to the raw data being published. The codes that resulted from data analysis are in this folder. Interview questions differed slightly from farmer to farmer as follow up questions may have been posed if needed. First interviews were performed, then focus groups were conducted and finally a workshop was organized. The qualitative reserach followed the research strategy and plan determined by the SUFISA project. On the project webpage (https://www.sufisa.eu/) more information can be found.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Katharina Biely;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | SUFISA (635577), EC | SUFISA (635577)

    This is the English version of the informed consent that has been used for staekholder interactions. Similar forms have been used for focus groups and workshops.

  • Open Access Spanish
    Authors: 
    Ramos, C.S.C;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | MAGIC (727698), EC | MAGIC (727698)

    Evaluación de alternativas agrícolas con especies de gramíneas perennes para biomasa en tierras marginales

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nesheim, Ingrid; Sundnes, Frode; Enge, Caroline; Graversgaard, Morten; Brink, Cors van den; Farrow, Luke; Glavan, Matjaž; Hansen, Birgitte; Amorim Leitão, Inês; Rowbottom, Jenny; +1 more
    Publisher: Molecular Diversity Preservation International - MDPI
    Country: Slovenia
    Project: EC | FAirWAY (727984)

    Solutions to current complex environmental challenges demand the consultation and involvement of various groups in society. In light of the WFD’s requirements of public participation, this paper presents an analysis of the establishment and development of nine different multi-actor platforms (MAPs) across Europe set up as arenas for long-term engagements to solve water quality challenges in relation to agriculture. The MAPs represent different histories and legacies of engagement some are recent initiatives and some are affiliated with previous government-initiated projects, while other MAPs are long-term engagement platforms. A case study approach rawing on insights from the nine engagement processes is used to discuss conditions for enabling long-term multi-actor engagement. The perceived pressure for change and preferred prioritization in complying with mitigating water quality problems vary within and among the MAPs. The results show that governmental and local actors’ concern for water quality improvements and focusing on pressure for change are important for establishing meaningful multi-actor engagement when concerns translate into a clear mandate of the MAP. Furthermore, the degree to which the MAPs have been able to establish relationships and networks with other institutions such as water companies, agricultural and environmental authorities, farmers, and civil society organizations influences possibilities for long-term meaningful engagement.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tanhua, Toste; Kazanidis, Georgios; Sá, Sandra; Neves, Caique; Obaton, Dominique; Sylaios, Georgios;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EurofleetsPlus (824077), EC | EuroSea (862626), EC | ODYSSEA (727277), EC | ATLAS (678760), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | iAtlantic (818123), EC | JERICO-S3 (871153), EC | AtlantECO (862923), EC | NAUTILOS (101000825), EC | MISSION ATLANTIC (862428),...

    Ten innovative EU projects to build ocean observation systems that provide input for evidence-based management of the ocean and the Blue Economy, have joined forces in the strong cluster ‘Nourishing Blue Economy and Sharing Ocean Knowledge’. Under the lead of the EuroSea project, the group published a joint policy brief listing recommendations for sustainable ocean observation and management. The cooperation is supported by the EU Horizon Results Booster and enables the group to achieve a higher societal impact. The policy brief will be presented to the European Commission on 15 October 2021. The ocean covers 70% of the Earth’s surface and provides us with a diverse set of ecosystem services that we cannot live without or that significantly improve our quality of life. It is the primary controller of our climate, plays a critical role in providing the air we breathe and the fresh water we drink, supplies us with a large range of exploitable resources (from inorganic resources such as sand and minerals to biotic resources such as seafood), allows us to generate renewable energy, is an important pathway for world transport, an important source of income for tourism, etc. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) evaluates the Blue Economy to currently represent 2.5% of the world economic value of goods and services produced, with the potential to further double in size by 2030 (seabed mining, shipping, fishing, tourism, renewable energy systems and aquaculture will intensify). However, the overall consequences of the intensification of human activities on marine ecosystems and their services (such as ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation, sea level rise, changing distribution and abundance of fish etc.) are still poorly quantified. In addition, on larger geographic and temporal scales, marine data currently appear fragmented, are inhomogeneous, contain data gaps and are difficult to access. This limits our capacity to understand the ocean variability and sustainably manage the ocean and its resources. Consequently, there is a need to develop a framework for more in-depth understanding of marine ecosystems, that links reliable, timely and fit-for-purpose ocean observations to the design and implementation of evidence-based decisions on the management of the ocean. To adequately serve governments, societies, the sustainable Blue Economy and citizens, ocean data need to be collected and delivered in line with the Value Chain of Ocean Information: 1) identification of required data; 2) deployment and maintenance of instruments that collect the data; 3) delivery of data and derived information products; and 4) impact assessment of services to end users. To provide input to the possible future establishment of such a framework, ten innovative EU projects to build user-focused, interdisciplinary, responsive and sustained ocean information systems and increase the sustainability of the Blue Economy, joined forces in a strong cluster to better address key global marine challenges. Under the lead of the EuroSea project, the group translated its common concerns to recommendations and listed these in the joint policy brief ‘Nourishing Blue Economy and Sharing Ocean Knowledge. Ocean Information for Sustainable Management.’. Following up on these recommendations will strengthen the entire Value Chain of Ocean Information and ensure sound sustainable ocean management. In this way, the 10 projects jointly strive to achieve goals set out in the EU Green Deal, the Paris Agreement (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) and the United Nations 2021-2030 Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Ocean Development. Toste Tanhua (GEOMAR), EuroSea coordinator: “It was great to collaborate with these other innovative projects and make joint recommendations based on different perspectives and expertise.”

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fullana-Pericàs, Mateu; M.À. Conesa; Douthe, Cyril; Aou-Ouad, Hanan El; Costea, Gerardo; Alonso, David; Canyelles, Jaume; J.M. Fontclara; Coll, Xavier; Jeroni Galmés;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | TomRes (727929)

    Climate change predictions indicate an increase of drought periods, especially in the Mediterranean region. These episodes of water-scarcity will be aggravated by possible reductions in the use of fertilizers, since their availability is expected to lower in next decades. The aim of this work is to assess the effect of water and nutrient stress in a 219 genotypes core collection (CC) of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) using highthroughput techniques, in order to identify the outstanding genotypes. Different classifications of this CC were made based on their growth habit, genetic selection or fruit type. All genotypes were grown under two different cultivation conditions: wellwatered (WW, covering 100% evapotranspiration and nutrient demands) and combined-stress (CS, no water and nutrient application after a month since transplantation). Plant area, leaf morphology, water use efficiency (measured by leaf δ13C isotopic composition and gas exchange), yield, fruit morphology and quality measurements were performed. As expected, plants grown in CS had lower plant area. However, within treatments, differences between genotypes were only found when comparing among growth habit. Traditional and heirloom genotypes reduced their leaf mass per area (LMA) as compared to modern genotypes in CS. A similar pattern was observed in δ13C, with lower values for the modern genotypes. These results can be partially explained by the consistently lower stomatal conductance (gs) of the traditional genotypes as compared to the modern ones. Thus, there was a negative relationship between leaf δ13C and gs, that was translated into a positive correlation between the former and the intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi). A reduction of total yield and fruit quality parameters in CS was observed also when comparing within genetic groups and fruit type. In conclusion, both traditional and heirloom genotypes were less affected by the CS treatment, being a suitable germplasm source to improve tomato crop.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Galmés, J; Fullana-Pericàs, M; Douthe, C; Costea, G; Conesa, M.À;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | TomRes (727929)

    Several experiments had studied the use of landraces to improve tomato crop, and specifically in terms of drought tolerance. However, their role and the interaction with the water scarcity when these landraces are used as rootstocks in grafted plants is not yet clear. The aim of this work is to study the physiological and agronomical changes in grafted tomato plants when using ‘Ramellet’ tomato, a drought tolerant landrace from the Balearic Islands. For this purpose, M82, two ‘Ramellet’, a hybrid ‘Ramellet’ (used for commercial purposes) and two commercial (‘Maxifort’ and ‘Emperador’) rootstock genotypes were reciprocally grafted and cultivated in greenhouse conditions in coco pith bags. Plants were grown under two different cultivation conditions: well-watered (WW, covering 100% water and nutrient demands) and combined-stress (CS, reduction of ~70% water and nutrient application). Analyses were undertaken covering different physiological and agronomical levels, including leaf and xylem anatomy, leaf gas-exchange, carbon isotopes, plant water status and fruit yield and quality, with non-grafted and self-grafted plants of each genotype used as controls. Combined stress reduced plant growth for all combinations, although at a different degree depending on the scion and rootstock. The changes in growth were related to differences on the number and diameter of xylem vessels that, in turn, affected the hydraulic capacity of the plants. There was a strong correlation between the apparent leaf hydraulic conductance and diffusional traits to CO2 for CS combinations, involving changes in leaf anatomy and carbon isotope composition. Differences were also found for leaf gas-exchange parameters and water use-efficiency among combinations, with a clear graft effect between non-grafted and self-grafted plants. Fruit yield and quality were affected by the treatment, but also for the rootstock. Overall, the present results highlights an effect of graft × treatment on the performance of tomato plants, offering a promising way to improve water use efficiency and fruit quality in horticultural crops.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sadeghi, Martiya; Bertrand, Guillaume; González, Francisco Javier; de Oliveira, Daniel Pipa Soares; Pereira, Aurete; Quental, Lídia; Decree, Sophie; Törmänen, Tuomo; Gautneb, Håvard; Marino, Egidio; +4 more
    Country: Portugal
    Project: EC | GeoERA (731166)

    ABSTRACT: One of the primary goals in FRAME project’s WP3 (Critical and Strategic Raw Materials Map of Europe), in collaboration with other work packages of FRAME and other GeoERA projects, is to produce and present the mineralisation and potential areas for CRM in Europe. Identifying new resources of supply critical mineral potential on land and in the European seabed for CRM needed for energy transition, is crucial for the European Union. In this regard, identifying and mapping of the major metallogenic areas for different type of mineralisation is essential. The global demand for CRM and strategic minerals containing cobalt, phosphorous, rare earth elements, tellurium, manganese, nickel, lithium and copper, concurrent with the rapidly diminishing quality and quantity of land-based mined deposits, has placed the seafloor as a promising new frontier for the exploration of mineral resources. To develop metallogenic research and models at regional and deposit scales, with special attention to strategic critical minerals, for which the EU’s downstream industry is highly dependent in the mid- and long-term perspectives, one must go from the known to the unknown, or at least, less known. Collating this information into favourable terrains is absolutely necessary to be able to understand mineralisation at the various scales. The latter was one of FRAME’s objectives as we will see developed below for phosphate and cobalt mineralisation. N/A

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Messéan, Antoine; Karley, Alison; Justes, Eric; Aubertot, Jean-Noël; Iannetta, Pietro; Muel, Frédéric; Zornoza, Raúl;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ReMIX (727217), EC | DiverIMPACTS (727482), EC | true (727973), EC | DIVERSify (727284), EC | Diverfarming (728003)

    The crop diversification cluster increases the impact of crop diversification research and supports scientific progress and actions enhancing diversification measures by Eurropean farmers and through innovations across the agri-food system. Find out more about crop diversification and what the cluster is doing in this flyer.