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2,740 Research products, page 1 of 274

  • SDSN - Greece
  • Publications
  • Open Access
  • European Marine Science

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  • Open Access
    Project: EC | CSA Oceans 2 (696324)

    Report on operational procedures for evaluation of policy and structuring actions

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lea-Anne Henry; J. Moreno Navas; J. M. Roberts;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Abstract. We investigated how the interactive effects of hydrography, topography and intrinsic community dynamics influence the assembly of species and functional traits across multiple spatial scales of a cold-water coral reef seascape. In a novel approach for these ecosystems, we use a spatially resolved complex three-dimensional flow model of hydrography to help explain assembly patterns. Forward selection of distance-based Moran's eigenvector mapping (dbMEM) variables identified two submodels of spatial scales at which communities are structured: broad-scale (across reef) and fine-scale (within reef). Canonical variance partitioning revealed broad-scale structures created mainly by variability in bathymetry and hydrography across reefs, which manifest as relatively narrow environmental niches for predators and scavenging detritivores. Fine-scale assembly was related more to processes that create spatially autocorrelated patches of fauna within a reef due to restricted dispersal in sessile fauna but social mating interactions and food supply in more mobile organisms. Our study implies that perturbations such as habitat fragmentation and altered hydrodynamic regimes have the potential to induce significant changes in the structure and function of cold-water coral reef ecosystems at spatial scales that span the entire seascape.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Teresa Amaro; Gian Marco Luna; Roberto Danovaro; David S.M. Billett; Marina R. Cunha;
    Publisher: Pergamon,, Oxford , Regno Unito
    Countries: Italy, Portugal
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354), FCT | SFRH/BPD/21459/2005 (SFRH/BPD/21459/2005)

    Sediments in the Nazare Canyon (NE Atlantic) are inhabited by unexpectedly high abundances of the deposit-feeding holothurian Molpadia musculus. The energetic demand of such a large megafaunal biomass is presumably high and requires the efficient exploitation of the food inputs coming from the photic zone. We hypothesise the existence of cooperative interactions between these deep-sea holothurians and prokaryotes in their guts. To investigate these interactions, sediment samples and holothurians were collected at ca. 3500 m depth using a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) and an incubation chamber used to "harvest" faeces from the holothurian. In all of these samples (ingested sediment from different sectors of the holothurian gut content, faeces and sediments) we determined total prokaryotic abundance, the relative abundance of Bacteria and Archaea (by means of Catalysed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation) and bacterial diversity (by means of fingerprinting techniques: ARISA and T-RFLP). Prokaryotic abundances and bacterial diversity in the holothurian gut were very high (up to 10(5) bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units) and significantly greater than in surrounding bottom sediments. Archaea represented a key component within the gut of the holothurians and in certain tracts dominated the prokaryotic assemblage. We also found that ca. 40% of bacterial OTUs were associated uniquely with the gut contents (i.e., absent in surrounding sediments). These findings suggest the occurrence of wide and highly diversified interactions between prokaryotes and deep-sea holothurians. Results presented here provide new insights into the potential relationships between deep-sea holothurians and specific associations of Archaea and Bacteria within their guts. The work opens new perspectives for investigating the diversity of prokaryotes associated to deep-sea megafauna. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sclafani, Patricia; Cappelletto, Margherita; Barbanti, Andrea; Cadiou, Jean-francois; Chevalier-de Corbiac, Claudiane; Herrouin, Guy; Ruel, Colin; Ciappi, Elena;
    Country: France
    Project: EC | BLUEMED (727453)

    In the framework of the BLUEMED project, the coordination action supporting the development of the BLUEMED Research and Innovation Initiative for blue jobs and growth in the Mediterranean area (www.bluemed-initiative.eu/), an overview and analysis of funding schemes available at different levels, from national to European and international, has been carried out. This task is part of the activities devoted to strengthening cooperation to consolidate and implement the BLUEMED Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). It complements the BLUEMED interconnecting Platforms developed by the four BLUEMED operational working groups on knowledge, economy, technology and policy, to update the SRIA and serves as reference tool in the process of developing an operational network of research funders and key players to favour synergies and coordinate the realization of the BLUEMED actions. This report can be considered a background document to initiate and facilitate dialogue and interaction between research funding agencies of different countries and European Institutions. Once the strategic alignment of agendas on areas of mutual interest has been identified, the aim is to lay the groundwork for operational alignment towards the launch of transnational actions. As a first step, a catalogue (Annex I and II) has been compiled for reviewing marine and maritime RTDI strategies. The collected information has been analysed to address opportunities of alignment for joint implementation of the BLUEMED SRIA (section 2) and finally provide a set of preliminary recommendations to develop the BLUEMED Implementation plan (section 3), one of the key deliverables of the project.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Amparo Picard-Sánchez; Itziar Estensoro; Raquel del Pozo; Oswaldo Palenzuela; M. C. Piazzon; Ariadna Sitjà-Bobadilla;
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ParaFishControl (634429)

    Enteromyxum leei is a myxozoan histozoic parasite that infects the intestine of several teleost fish species. In gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), it provokes a chronic disease, entailing anorexia, delayed growth, reduced marketability and mortality. Direct fish‐to‐fish transmission, relevant in aquaculture conditions, has been demonstrated for E. leei via effluent, cohabitation, and oral and anal routes. However, the minimum time of exposure for infection has not been established, nor the possible effect on the fish immune response. Two effluent trials were performed at different temperatures (high: average of 25.6°C; and low: constant at 18°C), different times of exposure to the effluent (1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks) and different population densities. The results showed that 1 week was enough to infect 100% of fish at high temperature and 58.3% at low temperature. High temperature not only increased the prevalence of infection in posterior intestine, but also induced a higher production of specific antibodies, limiting the progression of the infection along the intestine. Longer time of exposure to the parasite and higher fish densities facilitated E. leei infection. These results show that effective diagnosis, lowering animal density and removal of infected fish are key aspects to manage this disease in aquaculture facilities. This work has been carried out with financial support from the European Commission, Horizon 2020 Framework Programme H2020, Societal Challenges under grant agreement 634429 (ParaFishControl). This publication reflects only the authors' view, and the European Union cannot be held responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. IE was contracted under APOSTD/2016/037 grant by the “Generalitat Valenciana,” and MCP, under Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas CSIC PIE project no. 201740E013. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Project: EC | ClimeFish (677039)

    Provide an overview of legal challenges that need to be considered when developing strategies and suggest good practise recommendations of how these challenges can be addressed.

  • Publication . Project deliverable
    Open Access
    Project: EC | NOMORFILM (634588)

    Report about the generation of an European database on microalgae which includes information on cultivation conditions, cryopreservation protocols, product profile, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, origin and other characteristics.

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Martina Bocci; Andrea Barbanti; Sebastiano Carrer; Chiara Castellani; Emiliano Ramieri; Chiara Venier; Daniel Depellegrin; Alessandro Sarretta;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | MUSES (727451)

    Poster presented during the H2020 "MUSES" project stakeholder workshop ’Embracing opportunities – Ocean Multi-Use Action Plan development workshop’ (Venice - June 27th, 2018). The poster analyses the potential for development of Multi-Use in the Northern-Adriatic coastal waters by combining existing and innovative touristic services with other traditional economic sectors and assets on the area. Drivers, added values, barriers, and impacts of Multi-Use have been identified integrating desk analysis and stakeholders perception. The results show the existence of a good potential for Multi-Use development and Blue-Growth in the area, still limited by barriers, particularly in the field of legislation, administrative processes and stakeholders capacity. Needed actions at local and regional (sub-national) level are highlighted in order to exploit this potential.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gian Marco Luna; Karen Stumm; Antonio Pusceddu; Roberto Danovaro;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Despite the increasing recognition of the quantitative importance of Archaea in all marine systems, the protocols for a rapid estimate of Archaeal diversity patterns in deep-sea sediments have been only poorly tested yet. Sediment samples from 11 deep-sea sites (from 79°N to 36°N, at depths comprised from 469 to 5,571 m) were used to compare the performance of two different primer sets (ARCH21f/ARCH958r and ARCH109f/ARCH 915r) and three restriction enzymes (AluI, Rsa I, and HaeIII) for the fingerprinting analysis of Archaeal diversity using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP). In silico and experimental analyses indicated that different combinations of primer sets and restriction enzymes provided different values of benthic Archaeal ribotype richness and different Archaeal assemblage compositions. The use of the ARCH109f/ARCH 915r primer set in combination with AluI provided the best results (a number of ribotypes up to four folds higher than other combinations), suggesting that this primer set should be used in future studies dealing with the analysis of the patterns of Archaeal diversity in deep-sea sediments. Multivariate multiple regression analysis revealed that, whatever the T-RFLP protocol utilized, latitude and temperature explained most of the variance in benthic Archaeal ribotype richness, while water depth had a negligible role. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Borrelli; Anna Sabbatini; Gian Marco Luna; Maria Pia Nardelli; T. Sbaffi; Caterina Morigi; Roberto Danovaro; Alessandra Negri;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Italy, France
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically, these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but does not allow discrimination between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a new and useful approach to identify living cells possessing an active metabolism. Our work is the first test of the suitability of the FISH technique, based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect live benthic foraminifera. The protocol was applied on <I>Ammonia</I> group and Miliolids, as well as on agglutinated polythalamous (i.e., <I>Leptohalysis scottii</I> and <I>Eggerella scabra</I>) and soft-shelled monothalamous (i.e., <I>Psammophaga</I> sp. and saccamminid morphotypes) taxa. The results from FISH analyses were compared with those obtained, on the same specimens assayed with FISH, from microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and pseudopodial activity. Our results indicate that FISH targets only metabolically active foraminifera, and allows discerning from low to high cellular activity, validating the hypothesis that the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the probe is dependent upon the physiological status of cells. These findings support the usefulness of this molecular approach as a key tool for obtaining information on the physiology of living foraminifera, both in field and experimental settings.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to SDSN - Greece. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,740 Research products, page 1 of 274
  • Open Access
    Project: EC | CSA Oceans 2 (696324)

    Report on operational procedures for evaluation of policy and structuring actions

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lea-Anne Henry; J. Moreno Navas; J. M. Roberts;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Abstract. We investigated how the interactive effects of hydrography, topography and intrinsic community dynamics influence the assembly of species and functional traits across multiple spatial scales of a cold-water coral reef seascape. In a novel approach for these ecosystems, we use a spatially resolved complex three-dimensional flow model of hydrography to help explain assembly patterns. Forward selection of distance-based Moran's eigenvector mapping (dbMEM) variables identified two submodels of spatial scales at which communities are structured: broad-scale (across reef) and fine-scale (within reef). Canonical variance partitioning revealed broad-scale structures created mainly by variability in bathymetry and hydrography across reefs, which manifest as relatively narrow environmental niches for predators and scavenging detritivores. Fine-scale assembly was related more to processes that create spatially autocorrelated patches of fauna within a reef due to restricted dispersal in sessile fauna but social mating interactions and food supply in more mobile organisms. Our study implies that perturbations such as habitat fragmentation and altered hydrodynamic regimes have the potential to induce significant changes in the structure and function of cold-water coral reef ecosystems at spatial scales that span the entire seascape.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Teresa Amaro; Gian Marco Luna; Roberto Danovaro; David S.M. Billett; Marina R. Cunha;
    Publisher: Pergamon,, Oxford , Regno Unito
    Countries: Italy, Portugal
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354), FCT | SFRH/BPD/21459/2005 (SFRH/BPD/21459/2005)

    Sediments in the Nazare Canyon (NE Atlantic) are inhabited by unexpectedly high abundances of the deposit-feeding holothurian Molpadia musculus. The energetic demand of such a large megafaunal biomass is presumably high and requires the efficient exploitation of the food inputs coming from the photic zone. We hypothesise the existence of cooperative interactions between these deep-sea holothurians and prokaryotes in their guts. To investigate these interactions, sediment samples and holothurians were collected at ca. 3500 m depth using a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) and an incubation chamber used to "harvest" faeces from the holothurian. In all of these samples (ingested sediment from different sectors of the holothurian gut content, faeces and sediments) we determined total prokaryotic abundance, the relative abundance of Bacteria and Archaea (by means of Catalysed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation) and bacterial diversity (by means of fingerprinting techniques: ARISA and T-RFLP). Prokaryotic abundances and bacterial diversity in the holothurian gut were very high (up to 10(5) bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units) and significantly greater than in surrounding bottom sediments. Archaea represented a key component within the gut of the holothurians and in certain tracts dominated the prokaryotic assemblage. We also found that ca. 40% of bacterial OTUs were associated uniquely with the gut contents (i.e., absent in surrounding sediments). These findings suggest the occurrence of wide and highly diversified interactions between prokaryotes and deep-sea holothurians. Results presented here provide new insights into the potential relationships between deep-sea holothurians and specific associations of Archaea and Bacteria within their guts. The work opens new perspectives for investigating the diversity of prokaryotes associated to deep-sea megafauna. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sclafani, Patricia; Cappelletto, Margherita; Barbanti, Andrea; Cadiou, Jean-francois; Chevalier-de Corbiac, Claudiane; Herrouin, Guy; Ruel, Colin; Ciappi, Elena;
    Country: France
    Project: EC | BLUEMED (727453)

    In the framework of the BLUEMED project, the coordination action supporting the development of the BLUEMED Research and Innovation Initiative for blue jobs and growth in the Mediterranean area (www.bluemed-initiative.eu/), an overview and analysis of funding schemes available at different levels, from national to European and international, has been carried out. This task is part of the activities devoted to strengthening cooperation to consolidate and implement the BLUEMED Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA). It complements the BLUEMED interconnecting Platforms developed by the four BLUEMED operational working groups on knowledge, economy, technology and policy, to update the SRIA and serves as reference tool in the process of developing an operational network of research funders and key players to favour synergies and coordinate the realization of the BLUEMED actions. This report can be considered a background document to initiate and facilitate dialogue and interaction between research funding agencies of different countries and European Institutions. Once the strategic alignment of agendas on areas of mutual interest has been identified, the aim is to lay the groundwork for operational alignment towards the launch of transnational actions. As a first step, a catalogue (Annex I and II) has been compiled for reviewing marine and maritime RTDI strategies. The collected information has been analysed to address opportunities of alignment for joint implementation of the BLUEMED SRIA (section 2) and finally provide a set of preliminary recommendations to develop the BLUEMED Implementation plan (section 3), one of the key deliverables of the project.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Amparo Picard-Sánchez; Itziar Estensoro; Raquel del Pozo; Oswaldo Palenzuela; M. C. Piazzon; Ariadna Sitjà-Bobadilla;
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | ParaFishControl (634429)

    Enteromyxum leei is a myxozoan histozoic parasite that infects the intestine of several teleost fish species. In gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), it provokes a chronic disease, entailing anorexia, delayed growth, reduced marketability and mortality. Direct fish‐to‐fish transmission, relevant in aquaculture conditions, has been demonstrated for E. leei via effluent, cohabitation, and oral and anal routes. However, the minimum time of exposure for infection has not been established, nor the possible effect on the fish immune response. Two effluent trials were performed at different temperatures (high: average of 25.6°C; and low: constant at 18°C), different times of exposure to the effluent (1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks) and different population densities. The results showed that 1 week was enough to infect 100% of fish at high temperature and 58.3% at low temperature. High temperature not only increased the prevalence of infection in posterior intestine, but also induced a higher production of specific antibodies, limiting the progression of the infection along the intestine. Longer time of exposure to the parasite and higher fish densities facilitated E. leei infection. These results show that effective diagnosis, lowering animal density and removal of infected fish are key aspects to manage this disease in aquaculture facilities. This work has been carried out with financial support from the European Commission, Horizon 2020 Framework Programme H2020, Societal Challenges under grant agreement 634429 (ParaFishControl). This publication reflects only the authors' view, and the European Union cannot be held responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein. IE was contracted under APOSTD/2016/037 grant by the “Generalitat Valenciana,” and MCP, under Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas CSIC PIE project no. 201740E013. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access
    Project: EC | ClimeFish (677039)

    Provide an overview of legal challenges that need to be considered when developing strategies and suggest good practise recommendations of how these challenges can be addressed.

  • Publication . Project deliverable
    Open Access
    Project: EC | NOMORFILM (634588)

    Report about the generation of an European database on microalgae which includes information on cultivation conditions, cryopreservation protocols, product profile, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, origin and other characteristics.

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Martina Bocci; Andrea Barbanti; Sebastiano Carrer; Chiara Castellani; Emiliano Ramieri; Chiara Venier; Daniel Depellegrin; Alessandro Sarretta;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | MUSES (727451)

    Poster presented during the H2020 "MUSES" project stakeholder workshop ’Embracing opportunities – Ocean Multi-Use Action Plan development workshop’ (Venice - June 27th, 2018). The poster analyses the potential for development of Multi-Use in the Northern-Adriatic coastal waters by combining existing and innovative touristic services with other traditional economic sectors and assets on the area. Drivers, added values, barriers, and impacts of Multi-Use have been identified integrating desk analysis and stakeholders perception. The results show the existence of a good potential for Multi-Use development and Blue-Growth in the area, still limited by barriers, particularly in the field of legislation, administrative processes and stakeholders capacity. Needed actions at local and regional (sub-national) level are highlighted in order to exploit this potential.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gian Marco Luna; Karen Stumm; Antonio Pusceddu; Roberto Danovaro;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Despite the increasing recognition of the quantitative importance of Archaea in all marine systems, the protocols for a rapid estimate of Archaeal diversity patterns in deep-sea sediments have been only poorly tested yet. Sediment samples from 11 deep-sea sites (from 79°N to 36°N, at depths comprised from 469 to 5,571 m) were used to compare the performance of two different primer sets (ARCH21f/ARCH958r and ARCH109f/ARCH 915r) and three restriction enzymes (AluI, Rsa I, and HaeIII) for the fingerprinting analysis of Archaeal diversity using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP). In silico and experimental analyses indicated that different combinations of primer sets and restriction enzymes provided different values of benthic Archaeal ribotype richness and different Archaeal assemblage compositions. The use of the ARCH109f/ARCH 915r primer set in combination with AluI provided the best results (a number of ribotypes up to four folds higher than other combinations), suggesting that this primer set should be used in future studies dealing with the analysis of the patterns of Archaeal diversity in deep-sea sediments. Multivariate multiple regression analysis revealed that, whatever the T-RFLP protocol utilized, latitude and temperature explained most of the variance in benthic Archaeal ribotype richness, while water depth had a negligible role. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chiara Borrelli; Anna Sabbatini; Gian Marco Luna; Maria Pia Nardelli; T. Sbaffi; Caterina Morigi; Roberto Danovaro; Alessandra Negri;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Italy, France
    Project: EC | HERMIONE (226354)

    Benthic foraminifera are an important component of the marine biota, but protocols for investigating their viability and metabolism are still extremely limited. Classical studies on benthic foraminifera have been based on direct counting under light microscopy. Typically, these organisms are stained with Rose Bengal, which binds proteins and other macromolecules, but does not allow discrimination between viable and recently dead organisms. The fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) represents a new and useful approach to identify living cells possessing an active metabolism. Our work is the first test of the suitability of the FISH technique, based on fluorescent probes targeting the 18S rRNA, to detect live benthic foraminifera. The protocol was applied on <I>Ammonia</I> group and Miliolids, as well as on agglutinated polythalamous (i.e., <I>Leptohalysis scottii</I> and <I>Eggerella scabra</I>) and soft-shelled monothalamous (i.e., <I>Psammophaga</I> sp. and saccamminid morphotypes) taxa. The results from FISH analyses were compared with those obtained, on the same specimens assayed with FISH, from microscopic analysis of the cytoplasm colour, presence of pigments and pseudopodial activity. Our results indicate that FISH targets only metabolically active foraminifera, and allows discerning from low to high cellular activity, validating the hypothesis that the intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the probe is dependent upon the physiological status of cells. These findings support the usefulness of this molecular approach as a key tool for obtaining information on the physiology of living foraminifera, both in field and experimental settings.